Landscape Design

Landscape Planning

Posted by on Dec 22, 2015 in homepost, Landscape Design | 0 comments

Landscape Planning

We provide landscape planning input into planning applications. Advising on Trees, Landscape ecology, Botanical surveys, Breeam and CSH ecology reports. We also do Landscape Visual Impact Assessments LVIAs, for developments. Recent schemes include LVIAs for large factory buildings, caravan sites and wind farms.

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Assessing significance and sensitivity of visual effects

Posted by on Oct 26, 2015 in Landscape Design | 0 comments

Assessing significance and sensitivity of visual effects is a part of Landscape Visual Impact Assessment (LVIA). A LVIA can be a stand alone report or part of a Environmental Statement (ES) for a proposed development. Here at Landvision we specialise in LVIAs across Southern England, and Midlands, including Hampshire, Surrey, Kent and Sussex Determining visual effects and their significance are an intrinsic part of the LVIA assessment. This includes; looking at the contribution of each effect on the visual receptors. For each visual effect, the nature and sensitivity of the visual receptors...

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Ecological landscape design for South East England

Posted by on Dec 31, 2013 in Climate change, Ecology, Green Infrastructure, Landscape, Landscape Design, Uncategorized | 1 comment

Landvision’s landscape architects have the role of designing ecological landscape design for South East England in such a way as to make landscapes and ecology more resilient to change. Working within the confines of a specific development scheme, landscape architects can be limited in their scope of operation. However, Landvision landscape architects know that through a strong understanding of ecology, the prognosis of their final schemes will be better. They will be working together to produce pragmatic solutions for improving the environment and biodiversity. Habitat design, Ecological...

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Butterflies Ecology Landscape Design, Creating Habitat

Posted by on May 28, 2013 in Ecology, Landscape, Landscape Design | 0 comments

Butterflies This is the second article on Butterflies Ecology, the first can be found here Ecology and Landscape design for creating habitat for Butterflies. Butterflies ecology and what to do to help stem the trend of decline in butterflies, such as Small Tortoiseshells?There are a number of general habitat needs of butterflies.  By providing for these, butterflies can be conserved and encouraged.  The caterpillar stages require the correct food plants.  The adults require suitable plants for nectar.  Provide warm, sunny sheltered spots, preferably with a south facing aspect. Butterflies...

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Native Hedges- encourage biodiversity

Posted by on May 24, 2013 in Ecology, Hedges, Landscape, Landscape Design | 0 comments

Native Hedges helping to join habitats. Top tip * – Native hedges should use a mix of  trees and shrubs, the best plants for wildlife  in the UK, are those native to the UK . These include Hawthorn, Blackthorn, Wild Privet and Dogwood. Using native trees and shrub varieties will provide the highest wildlife value; providing flowers and later berries for food for insects, birds and small mammals. Consider these points when planning your wildlife hedge; The greater the number of hedge species, the greater the variety of wildlife. Plants should be suited to local soils. Plant hedges in a...

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Butterfly Ecology

Posted by on May 22, 2013 in Ecology, Landscape, Landscape Design | 0 comments

Butterfly Ecology                         Why should we worry about butterfly ecology? It is not only because butterflies are attractive. They are also important pollinators of our wild flowers. They are one of the first visible indicators of changes in habitats. They are easily spotted and recorded. The decline of butterflies and their habitats in Europe is why studying them and conserving them is important. Listen to David Attenborough on Radio 4’s Today program talking about RSPBs  State of Nature report. The life of the...

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